Jimi Hendrix


 
AccueilCalendrierFAQRechercherMembresGroupesS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Alan Douglas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Titi



Messages : 3762
Date d'inscription : 05/06/2010

MessageSujet: Alan Douglas   Lun 12 Juil 2010 - 18:33

ALAN DOUGLAS: HENDRIX PRODUCER UNDER FIRE

by Michael Davis c. BAM Magazine Aug 25 95


Well, it looks like Jimi Hendrix fans won't have Alan Douglas to kick around any longer. Just a few weeks after BAM talked to the producer at length about his experiences with such musical revolutionaries as Hendrix, Duke Ellington, and the Last Poets., he agreed to return all of Jimi's property, including master tapes, to the late rock star's father, Al Hendrix, as part of an out of court settlement of a long-pending lawsuit. Four ongoing projects of Hendrix material - a double live CD, a book with the working title of A Room Full Of Mirrors, a documentary, and a soundtrack album to the documentary - will be completed in the next few months and released some time next year. What comes out after that will be up to Al Hendrix and his advisers.

Douglas' 20-year stewardship of Jimi's recorded legacy has certainly been astormy one. Going by the dictum that, " Anything that Jimi recorded that he didn't release himself could have been changed," Douglas overdubbed or remixed many of the studio tracks he released. Examples of both approaches can be found on this year's controversial Voodoo Soup, which has garnered both praise and damnation in equal helpings. On the other hand, the now out of print Nine To The Universe album proved that there were still Hendrix gems to be found in the reels of studio jams.

Once he got his first taste of the music industry in the late 50s by selling his debut pop production to Roulette Records, Douglas rose rapidly in the industry, thanks to his savvy, his musical knowledge, and his hustle. By 1962, he was heading United Artists' jazz line, and during the following decade, produced landmark sessions for Duke Ellington, Eric Dolphy, and John McLaughlin on UA and other labels. But the first time he heard Jimi Hendrix, he knew music was moving into a new realm and went with it.

Douglas also acted quickly the first time he saw the Last Poets, becoming their producer of their classic recordings. The Last Poets and This Is Madness established the Harlem-based street poets who predated politically conscious hip-hop by over a decade. Since the Last Poets are touring behind their Bill Laswell produced Holy Terror album at the moment, it's perhaps
apt to start with them.

* * *

HOW DID YOU BECOME THE FIRST ONE TO RECORD THE LAST POETS?

I heard a snatch of material on television one night, and it stopped me short. It was on PBS, so I called the station, and I got an address and a telephone number. I called the next day and got a very hostile voice on the phone. I told them who I was and that I had heard a little bit of their material on television the night before, and I would like to talk to them about making records. So he said, "Well, if you want to hear it, man, you gotta come up here, and you have to be alone." Real hostile shit! So I said, "Where's up here?" and he made a date with me at 137th Street and Lennox Avenue. So, I went up there, and it was a schoolyard with two old, funky basketball courts with rims and no nets. I looked over at one of the courts, and there was a whole bunch of black guys - must have been 25 of them - standing there. I got out of the car and walked over, thinking, "This is either suicide or a great sign." As I got there, the crowd kind of separated, and these four guys were left. There were three rappers and a conga player standing underneath a basket. They pointed at the foul line and said, "You stand there," and they did the material that ended up on the first album with me. So I said, "Come to the studio with me right now, and we'll record this. If you like the tape, we'll do a deal; if you don't like it, you take the tape with you." They thought that was reasonable. They all jumped in my car, and we went down to a friend of mine's studio on 66th Street, and we recorded the whole thing in one afternoon. They liked it. I got whatever money together I could - $1,000 or something - and we did a deal. I put the record out, and the rest is history.

WHEW!

The, one of them ended up in the joint, so I did the next record, This Is Madness, with just two of them. I had to use more recording techniques on the second one because we had less power from the group itself.

YEAH, BUT THE PRODUCTION WORKED, "O.D." PROBABLY BEING THE BEST KNOWN EXAMPLE.

Yeah, it worked because of the material. They were all good rappers, but those first two albums contain the most interesting material. The only other album I did with one of them, Jalal, was one called The Hustlers Convention...

...WHICH HAS A REP FOR BEING A BRIDGE BETWEEN THE LAST POETS AND HIP-HOP.

Right, because that was gangsta rap from an objective, rather than a subjective, point of view. The Hustlers Convention was, essentially, a toast, which was the original art form that rap came from. The Poets came out of the old black prison tradition of jail toasts. Jalal wrote that whole thing from pieces of things he'd been hearing for years. We also did more stuff, like the toast about the famous hooker, Doriella Du Fontaine, with Jimi. I was recording Jimi one day and Jalal walked in. I had him do it for Buddy [Miles], and Buddy got all involved with it and started playing with him. Jimi came in and said, "Wait for me," and he jumped in on it. They improvised 13 minutes straight; it was beautiful.

HOW DID A JAZZ PRODUCER HOOK UP WITH HENDRIX?

When I went to United Artists to start a jazz label, recording the great jazz artists was my goal. I was in the studio with Art Blakey, Duke Ellington, Charlie Mingus, and Eric Dolphy. Working with the masters. Then I heard Jimi Hendrix on the radio one day. I immediately ran to the record store, bought Are You Experienced?, and listened to that. He just blew everybody away. I found myself with Miles Davis one night, sitting up in the lighting booth at the Fillmore, listening to him. I found myself with other jazz artists who couldn't quite figure out what he was doing or where he came from. Although you could never categorize him as a jazz artist, he incorporated jazz, because he was probably the best improviser I ever heard, and that's what jazz is basically all about. I mean, he himself said, "I can't stand somebody playing 'How High The Moon' for half an hour," so he never considered himself a jazz player. But the jazz players sure did. Look at his stuff with Larry Young. Miles Davis and John McLaughlin had tremendous admiration for him, and I felt he was the one who incorporated all the musical influences that went down in the last hundred years into his own music. There was Robert Johnson, and there was Muddy Waters, and there was John Coltrane, and Thelonious Monk, and Charlie Mingus.

PLUS THE AIRPLANE NOISES!

He could listen to a truck go by and say, "Hey, that sounds good."

WELL, HE COULD INCORPORATE THAT INTO HIS MUSIC.

Exactly. Right now, I'm mixing what I'm calling On The Road, which is a double live album of what I consider to be his best live performances. I was listening to "Machine Gun" from the Berkeley concert yesterday, and it still amazes me. And that was 1970, when he was supposed to be burned out.

WAS THERE EVER A DEFINITIVE STUDIO VERSION OF "MACHINE GUN"?

There's a version, but I wouldn't call it definitive or I would have used it on Voodoo Soup. "Machine Gun" was one of those songs where Jimi could get his ya-yas out on stage. If he was angry that day, it would sound even better, and he would react to the audience a lot. But, in the studio, it was too efficient; his solos didn't get off like they did live.

YOU SAID THAT YOU'RE DOING THESE REISSUES PRIMARILY FOR A YOUNGER CROWD. WAS THERE A SPECIFIC MIXING STRATEGY THAT YOU DIRECTED TO THAT END?

My constantly being quoted about the younger crowd has been a little overblown. As Jimi said, "It's younger MINDS," I don't care if someone is 50 years old, they ought to be able to relate to what's available today and not hang onto this nostalgia about what used to be. So, there are major changes in the mixes, because the technology has gone through major changes. We have technology today that can take out pops and hiss and all that normal machine and tape noise.

SO YOU CAN HEAR AL THE INSTRUMENTS MORE CLEARLY.

That's what it's all about, man. Can you get to the musician's fingers? Can you get to his strings?, whatever it is that's making the music?

THE MIXES ON VOODOO SOUP SEEM TO BE MORE DOWN THE MIDDLE THAN THE ORIGINAL ONES.

It's a question of balance. Mixing is subject to the way something was recorded, and there's stuff leaking into all these tracks. Something might be on one side because that's the way we can minimize the leakage on something else. But there are no rules. You just sit down and listen and do the best thing you can to get the best sound you can. The focus is on Jimi, but, by the same token, if the drums don't sound good, then it makes Jimi sound not so good.

I HAVE TO CONGRATULATE YOU ON THAT BECAUSE, FOR THE MOST PART, YOU'VE IMPROVED THE WAY THE DRUM TRACKS SOUND.

It's not a question of what's better or what's worse; it's a question of how you do things. Eddie Kramer and Mitch Mitchell and those guys were in a different mode back then; there were different musical values, and so on. That was still the psychedelic era, and Jimi was supposed to be one of those guys, so they got more - I hate to even use the word but that's how everybody relates to it - psychedelic sounds, more slapback, more moving from side to side.

THERE ISN'T MUCH OF THAT AT ALL ON VOODOO SOUP; IT'S MORE SOLID.

For me, the music is straight ahead. If it's happening, you don't need any of that. But, in those days, it was making people feel better about the music. I don't think you can compare the two, I really don't. You just have to evaluate something from the way you hear it now, not what used to be. That seems to be the problem with the purists and the collectors. If I wanted to direct myself to them, I could be throwing records out on the street every minute. They don't care, they want to hear Jimi's mistakes, and, if I could put one of his old socks in there, I'd sell even more.

I KEEP WONDERING WHEN SOMEBODY'S GONNA PUT OUT A BOOTLEG OF HIM TAKING A LEAK.

If someone has a tape of that, it's probably one of their prized possessions. I just can't address that.

YOU HAVE TO UNDERSTAND, FOR SOME OF THESE PEOPLE, IT'S LIKE A RELIGIOUS THING. IT'S LIKE YOU'VE REMIXED THE BIBLE!

Well, look what Christianity did to the Old Testament, man. And now they're BOTH accepted.

YEAH, BUT NOBODY KNOWS WHO REMIXED THE BIBLE. YOUR NAME IS ON THIS THING.

Well, in 10 years time, they'll forget me, too.


Source : http://www.me.umn.edu/~kgeisler/ad.html



Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titi



Messages : 3762
Date d'inscription : 05/06/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Lun 12 Juil 2010 - 18:34

Voici un lien particulièrement intéressant où est évoqué l'enregistrement avorté entre Miles Davis, Tony Williams et Jimi Hendrix... selon Alan Douglas (p.29) :

http://www.douglasrecords.com/bio.htm

En prime, il parle aussi du projet de Jimi Hendrix avec Gil Evans et du Devotion de John McLaughlin, avec Buddy Miles aux baguettes.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titi



Messages : 3762
Date d'inscription : 05/06/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Lun 12 Juil 2010 - 18:35




Un article sur Alan :

http://www.studiowner.com/essays/essay.asp?books=0&pagnum=97
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titi



Messages : 3762
Date d'inscription : 05/06/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Lun 12 Juil 2010 - 18:38











Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Sgt. Pepper



Messages : 185
Date d'inscription : 19/05/2011
Age : 27

MessageSujet: Interview d'Alan Douglas   Mar 31 Mai 2011 - 20:14

Alan Douglas interviewé par Pierre-Jean Crittin.

Alan Douglas est un producteur de musique né le 20 juillet 1931. Il est connu pour avoir géré l'héritage discographique post mortem de Jimi Hendrix de 1975 à 1995. La publication de Crash Landing en 1975 suscita de vives controverses.


Dans quel circonstances avez-vous rencontré Jimi hendrix pour la première fois ?
Je l'ai rencontré backstage au festival de Woodstock. Michael Lang, l'un des producteurs du festival, avait monté un petit campement derrière la scène où il avait invité des amis et les gens qui travaillent aux festival. Tout le monde traînait la pendant les concerts. Jimi était programmé a minuit et ne joua qu'à 7 heures du matin. On n'a beaucoup parlé cette nuit-là, c'est comme ça qu'on est devenu amis.

Et quand l'avez-vous revu ?
Peu de temps après, deux semaines plus tard, il me semble. C'était a New-York.

Comment cette amitié mutuelle s'est-elle développée en collaboration professionnelle ?
Jimi vivait a New-York. Il ne connaissait personne, n'avait pas de famille sur place, pas d'amis proches. Ma femme et sa petite amie avaient une boutique où elles vendaient des habits pour des musiciens rock. Il allait souvent là-bas et achetait ses superbes vestes en cuir avec des franges – celle qu'il portait à Woodstock venait de là-bas. Il passait ses soirées a la maison, on dînait presque tous les soirs ensemble. On n'est devenu comme une famille.

A cette époque, pensait-il déjà à changer de groupe, à aller dans une autre direction, avec Billy Cox et Buddy Miles ?
Il avait déjà commencé travailler avec eux quand je l'ai connu. Billy Cox Jouait a Woodstock. Je ne sais pas exactement ce qui s'est passé avec Mitch Mitchell, mais il a quitté le groupe et est retourné à Londres. Buddy s'est alors rapproché de Jimi. Jimi a toujours adoré le jeu de Mitch qui le stimulait énormément. Je ne crois pas qu'il ait vraiment pris la décision intentionnelle de se diriger vers une musique plus R'n'B, plus noire. Il aimait juste joué avec Billy, car il l'aimait beaucoup. C'était un membre naturel de son groupe, car ils se connaissaient depuis longtemps, ils avaient fait l'armée ensemble.

Vous étiez au Fillmore East le jour de l'an 1970 pour le concert du Band of Gypsys ?
Bien sûr, j'ai vu les deux concerts.

Les chroniques après concerts étaient mitigées.
Toute personne qui y a assisté vous dira à quel point ce fut des concerts phénoménaux. Bien sûr, certaines personnes étaient fâchées que Jimi soit passé d'un groupe blanc à un groupe noir, et ils n'ont parlé que de ça au lieu d'écouter la musique. Ils étaient davantage intéressés par l'aspect social de la chose, mais si vous écoutez le concert ou regardez la vidéo, il n'y a pas de doute possible. Il s'agit probablement de la meilleur prestation live de Jimi de toute sa carrière.

Certaines histoire prétendent qu'il avait pris des nouveaux musiciens, des noirs, sous la pression de militants du Black Power...
C'est faux, absolument faux. Il n'aurait jamais accepté de telles pressions. Jamais.

Pourquoi ce projet n'est-il pas devenu un projet de studio ?
Quel aurait été l'intérêt ? Les performances en concert étaient superbes, le matériau est né de ces concerts. Pourquoi les dupliquer ?

Ces concerts ont-ils été une inspiration pour votre travail avec Hendrix ?
Les choses qu'on a faites ensemble ont eu lieu auparavant. On a travaillé d'octobre à décembre 1969, à peu près trois mois et demi. A cette époque, son management se faisait du souci. Il voulait que Jimi reste sur la route pour générer des revenus, pas qu'il passe du temps en studio avec moi. Il passa donc le début de l'année 69 en tournée, puis ouvrit son studio Electric Lady, puis repartit sur la route... Il a eu peu de temps libre pour travailler dans son studio.

Parmi les choses que vous avez sorties, Nine To The Universe est l'une des plus consistantes.
(Silence) Ouais, foutons-nous de savoir comment ça a été apprécié...(Silence) Jimi avait plein d'idées. Après les trois premiers albums qui ont été d'énormes succès, il était frustrés. Il écrivait tout le temps de nouvelles chansons, mais n'avait pas le temps de les enregistrer. Il réfléchissait constamment aux nouvelles formes qu'il pourrait donner à sa musique. C'est de là qu'est né notre dialogue. Il me parlait de morceaux instrumentaux qu'il avait en tête, des esquisses – n'oubliez pas que Jimi n'écrivait pas la musique. On parlait beaucoup de l'album Sketches Of Spain de Miles Davis qu'il adorait. Alors, j'ai appelé Gil et je l'ai présenté a Jimi. Je voulais qu'il donne a Jimi le même genre d'environnement qu'il avait donné à Miles. Pas le même son, mais le même environnement conceptuel, sur un disque de Blues cette fois si. Et on allait faire un album qui se serait appelé Voodoo Child Plays The Blues avec le Gil Evans Orchestra et Gil Evans aux orchestrations. De cette façon, Jimi aurait eu juste à jouer et n'aurait pas eu a s'occuper des arrangements et des orchestrations. Mais Jimi n'est jamais revenu de son voyage et le disque ne s'est jamais fait.

Que pensez-vous des compositions d'Hendrix jouées par le Gil Evans Orchestra plus tard et du disque Gil Evans Plays Hendrix ?
Le disque, je ne l'aime pas beaucoup parce que Gil Evans n'a pas réalisé tout les arrangements, il a fait les arrangements sur une ou deux chansons seulement. Mais depuis, j'ai eu l'occasion d'entendre ses propres arrangements de « Little Wing » qui sont absolument magnifiques.

Quel regard portez-vous aujourd'hui sur les albums que vous avez sorti après ça mort : le controversé Crash Landing, Nine To The Universe, Voodoo Soup et Blues ?
Ces disques ont été analysés jusqu'à la moindre note par un certain nombre de gens... Sa fait longtemps que je ne les ai pas écoutés moi-même. N'oubliez pas que quand je travaillait avec Jimi, j'avais ma propre compagnie de disques et plein et d'autres projets en route. J'aimais Jimi comme un fan, je voulais l'aider, et c'est comme ça qu'ont a commencé à travaillé ensemble – parce qu'il n'y avait personne pour l'aider. C'est lui qui m'a demandé de venir au studio. Quoi qu'il en soit, mon sentiment est qu'il savait assez bien où il voulait aller. Conceptuellement, en tout cas. Ce qu'on essayait de faire ensemble, c'est de poser des bases rythmiques, et une fois c'est bases posées, il pouvait faire tout le reste : jouer les parties de guitare lead, chanter, jouer de la basse... Ce que je préfère dans ce qu'on a fait, c'est le morceau avec Larry Young sur Nine To The Universe . Il montre a quel point Jimi Est free à quel point il est capable d'interagir avec un autre musicien. Larry était l'un des meilleurs musicien que je connaissais à l'époque. La plupart des artistes hésitaient beaucoup à travailler avec Jimi. Mais Larry n'était pas comme ça.

Probablement le meilleur album d'Hendrix paru après ça mort est l'album Blues, que vous avez produit.
Voilà un disque sur lequel, j'ai travaillé des semaines et pour lequel on ne m'a rien dit, ni en bien ni en mal. Je le prends pour un compliment, parce que le travail du producteur est précisement de rendre un produit fini qui fonctionne, par tous les moyens.

Ces morceaux ont été « édités » par vos soins ?
Oui, et pas qu'un peu. Prenez « Mannish Boy » de Muddy Waters. C'est un morceau que Jimi essayait de jouer quand je travaillais avec lui. C'était l'un de ses Blues favoris. On a fait 27 prises différentes, et aucune de ces prises ne va du début à la fin du morceau. On a fait des milliers d'édits sur cet album. Personne ne s'en est rendu compte, à commencer par tous les journalistes qui ont analysé ces disques et n'avaient pour but que de déverser leur négativité sur Jimi.

Quand Hendrix arrive à New-York pour la première fois en 1965, il semble avoir été exposé a la musique de John Coltrane et Ornette Coleman. Est-ce qu'on sait quelque chose de plus à ce propos ?
Je ne crois pas qu'on en sache plus. Comme tout le monde à New-York à cette époque, il a été exposé a la musique qui se jouait dans les clubs. Et à ce moment-là, le jazz était probablement la musique Américaine prééminente. Le rock n'avait pas encore pris l'espace qu'il a pris maintenant ou même à la fin des années 60. Alors, oui, le jazz passait beaucoup à la radio, dans les clubs et, comme nous tous qui étions a New-York a cette époque, il a été exposé au jazz.

Il y a tout de même cette histoire de Hendrix jammant avec « Rashaan » Roland Kirk dans un club. Est-elle véridique ?
Oui, c'est vrai, absolument véridique. Mais c'était à Londres quelques années plus tard. Quand il arrive à New-York, il ne joue avec personne de la scène jazz. C'est un inconnu, un jeune musicien qui essaye de se faire une place et les musiciens qu'il admire, les Miles Davis, les John Coltrane, eux étaient déjà connus et travaillaient. Il n'était pas admis dans leur environnement et par conséquent n'aurait pas pu jammer avec eux.

Miles Davis mentionne plusieurs fois dans son autobiographie le nom d'Hendrix et on sait qu'il y avait un projet entre les deux. Est-ce qu'on n'en sait plus ?
Je vais vous décevoir, mais il n'y a rien qui n'ait été déjà dit ou écrit. Laissez-moi vous expliquer une chose : Hendrix n'a jamais eu la mentalité d'un musicien de jazz. Mais Jimi vient du Blues et du Rythm'n'Blues comme les musiciens de jazz. C'est seulement au début de l'année 1967, quand tout le monde aux Etats-Unis l'a entendu, qu'on n'a commencé a comprendre que c'était un homme dont les racines venait de là. Le blues est à l'origine de toute la musique Américaine, indifféremment des formes qu'elles prend. C'est donc un musicien qui a évolué essentiellement à partir du blues et du Rythm'n'Blues vers le rock et qui a incorporé des éléments de jazz sans être un musicien de jazz. Et quand les Herbie Hancock, les Miles Davis, les John McLaughlin et tous les autres grands musiciens de jazz sont venus le voir, pour comprendre ce qu'il faisait, d'où lui venait son inspiration, sa facilité, son habilité, et c'est comme ça que Miles l'a approché. Ils ont commencé à se voir. Il y avait un cercle d'amis à New-York dont faisaient partie Miles, Jimi, moi et d'autres, par conséquent, il y eut beaucoup de conversations entre eux. Voilà comment ça a évolué. Le jazz est essentiellement une musique d'improvisation autour d'une mélodie et cette forme classique de jazz à évolué jusqu'aux Ornette Coleman et John Coltrane des dernières années. Mais Jimi faisait déjà ça. Il avait déjà incorporé cet élément d'improvisation libre dans son jeu. Voilà pourquoi les musiciens de jazz avaient cette admiration et cet immense respect pour lui.

Il n'y a donc absolument aucun enregistrement existant de Hendrix et de Miles Davis jouant ensemble ?
Non, absolument aucun.

Quand on évoque les liens entre Hendrix et le rap, il faut parler du disque qu'il a enregistré avec Jalal du groupe de rap New-Yorkais « The Last Poets » sorti sous le nom de « Doriella Du Fontaine ».
C'était un collaboration accidentelle. Un jour, j'étais dans le studio attendant que Hendrix arrive. Buddy Miles était dans le studio également. Et jalal est venu me rendre visite. On était assis dans le studio. J'avais déjà enregistré Jalal et les Lasts Poets auparavant. A l'époque on voulait faire ensemble un album qui s'appelerait « Jail Toast », basé sur les poèmes scandés des prisonniers. Le rap vient de là, du « Jail Toast » et Doriella du Fontaine est un de ces raps dans le genre du « Jail Toast ». Alors j'ai dit a jalal : « Pourquoi ne va tu pas dans le studio réciter « Doriella » pour Buddy, il va aimer ça ». Il a donc commencé a le faire pour Buddy. Buddy était assis à sa batterie et a commencé à frapper un beat pendant que jalal récitait le poème, puis Jimi est arrivé dans le studio. Il les a entendus et a dit : « Arrêtez, arrêtez laissez moi venir jouer. » Alors on n'a placé Jalal dans un cabine pour enregistrer les voix et l'on a mis Jimi devant la cabine avec une guitare et Buddy à sa batterie, et ils ont fait une improvisation non-stop de 13 minutes avec Jimi et Jalal se regardant de chaque côté de la vitre et se tuant l'un et l'autre ! C'est un des meilleurs moments de studio.

Le groupe de rap «The digable Planets » jouait un morceau, « Jimi Diggin Cats », dans lequel ils disaient que si Jimi était encore vivant aujourd'hui, il ferait du rap. Qu'un pensez-vous ?
Je pense qu'il participerait, qu'il aiderait... Mais vous savez, Jimi faisait du rap, de toute façon. Ecoutez « Axis Bold as Love », c'est pratiquement du rap. Il ne se considérait pas lui-même comme un grand chanteur, alors il rappait beaucoup. Et il adorait les Last Poets à cette époque. Il avait même fait une pub radio pour eux. Alors, bien sûr, il participerait.

Si vous etiez toujours aux commandes, quels enregistrement essentiels d'Hendrix sortiriez-vous ?
Vous savez, le public de Hendrix est très jeune. D'après mes recherches qui ont été faites à partir de la compilation The Ultimate Experience, 60% des acheteurs ont moins de 21 ans. Il faut donc se diriger vers ce public-là.




(Source : Hendrix - l'Enfant Vaudou (collectif) [2010] aux éditions Consart)


Dernière édition par Sgt. Pepper le Mer 8 Juin 2011 - 21:38, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Tiger



Messages : 471
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2011
Age : 20
Localisation : Third Stone From the Sun

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Mer 1 Juin 2011 - 17:51

Merci !
Alan Douglas, un homme plus ou moins aimés, qui a sortis des trucs bien et d'autres mois bien... avec plus ou moins de musiciens studios dedans...
Aussi, c'est la première fois que je vois à quoi il ressemble et je me suis demandé ce que c'était... On dirait un homme des bois, où alors, il a pas digéré la fin du mouvement hippie.
Pour la majorité des acheteurs de moins de 21 ans... c'est lui qui le dit... je n'en sais rien de mon côté mais je connais peu de jeunes de cet âge (en prenant comme exemple mon collège, avec des jeunes plus ou moins normaux) et je suis probablement l'un des seuls à écouté ou a acheté du Hendrix...
Cette Interview date de quand ? Elle est récente, mais environ quand, en 3-4 ans, les choses changent et ce qu'il a dit sur ceux qui achètent Hendrix peut se révéler moins vrai maintenant que ça l'était à l'époque.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Sgt. Pepper



Messages : 185
Date d'inscription : 19/05/2011
Age : 27

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Mer 1 Juin 2011 - 19:15

Tiger a écrit:
Merci !
Alan Douglas, un homme plus ou moins aimés, qui a sortis des trucs bien et d'autres mois bien... avec plus ou moins de musiciens studios dedans...
Aussi, c'est la première fois que je vois à quoi il ressemble et je me suis demandé ce que c'était... On dirait un homme des bois, où alors, il a pas digéré la fin du mouvement hippie.
Pour la majorité des acheteurs de moins de 21 ans... c'est lui qui le dit... je n'en sais rien de mon côté mais je connais peu de jeunes de cet âge (en prenant comme exemple mon collège, avec des jeunes plus ou moins normaux) et je suis probablement l'un des seuls à écouté ou a acheté du Hendrix...
Cette Interview date de quand ? Elle est récente, mais environ quand, en 3-4 ans, les choses changent et ce qu'il a dit sur ceux qui achètent Hendrix peut se révéler moins vrai maintenant que ça l'était à l'époque.

je sais pas de quand date cette interview, c'est pas mentionné.
c'est vrai que peu de jeune écoute du Hendrix, très peu écoute du rock de tout façon. Mes potes aiment pas le rock ils trouvent ça nul, ils écoutent du lady Gaga ou du David Guetta, je suis donc l'exception qui confirme la règle!!! Jimi Hendrix est quasiment inexistant dans les médias, on l'entend jamais a la radio ou a la télé et c'est valable pour la plupart des artistes des années 60's ou 70's.
Et puis avec le téléchargement illégal c'est impossible de savoir le nombre de jeune qui écoute réellement Jimi comparé aux années 80 et 90. Mais Il me semble que Jimi est l'artiste mort qui vend le plus d'album après Elvis Presley et peut-être qu'Hendrix ce vend mieux dans les pays Anglophones ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Purple Jim



Messages : 2259
Date d'inscription : 09/07/2010

MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Mer 1 Juin 2011 - 20:23

Alan Douglas a écrit:

C'était un collaboration accidentelle. Un jour, j'étais dans le studio attendant que Hendrix arrive. Buddy Miles était dans le studio également. Et jalal est venu me rendre visite. On était assis dans le studio. J'avais déjà enregistré Jalal et les Lasts Poets auparavant. A l'époque on voulait faire ensemble un album qui s'appelerait « Jail Toast », basé sur les poèmes scandés des prisonniers. Le rap vient de là, du « Jail Toast » et Doriella du Fontaine est un de ces raps dans le genre du « Jail Toast ». Alors j'ai dit a jalal : « Pourquoi ne va tu pas dans le studio réciter « Doriella » pour Buddy, il va aimer ça ». Il a donc commencé a le faire pour Buddy. Buddy était assis à sa batterie et a commencé à frapper un beat pendant que jalal récitait le poème, puis Jimi est arrivé dans le studio. Il les a entendus et a dit : « Arrêtez, arrêtez laissez moi venir jouer. » Alors on n'a placé Jalal dans un cabine pour enregistrer les voix et l'on a mis Jimi devant la cabine avec une guitare et Buddy à sa batterie, et ils ont fait une improvisation non-stop de 13 minutes avec Jimi et Jalal se regardant de chaque côté de la vitre et se tuant l'un et l'autre ! C'est un des meilleurs moments de studio.

Ceci est en contradiction avec le "press release" pour la récente ré-édition de "Doriella du Fontaine" par Experience Hendrix :


"To celebrate and support Record Store Day 2011, the newly re-launched and Karakos-powered Celluloid Records presents a limited repress of the classic "Doriella Du Fontaine". The project began in late 1969 with famed producer Alan Douglas recording the unmistakable Jimi Hendrix and legendary Buddy Miles in rolling and groove-laden musical backdrop. Fast forward 4 years and Lightnin' Rod (aka Jalaluddin Mansur Nuriddin) adds in his distinctive vocal soundtrack. Rod calls it "spoagraphics" (spoken pictures) but to most listeners hear it as the roots of an early form of rap. Rhythm, spoken-word and the art of the storyteller all wrapped up into one. The two meld together to create something new and unheard in 1973 and something still sounding fresh in 2011."
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://pagesperso-orange.fr/hendrix.guide/hendrix.htm
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Alan Douglas   Aujourd'hui à 22:21

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Alan Douglas
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Alan Douglas
» John McLaughlin : Devotion (1970)
» Johnny B. Goode - An Original Video Soundtrack (1986)
» Alan Menken
» Alan Curtis et Il Complesso Barocco

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Jimi Hendrix :: LES FILMS, LES PHOTOS ET LES LIVRES :: Ezy Reader-
Sauter vers: